ATAC TVT Firearms Channel Viewer Q & A: What is a Barrel Booster?

Jim Fuller and Tom Clarke with ATAC discuss the reliability of the short-barreled rifles with and without the booster attached.

ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
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    ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
    ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
    ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
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    Jim Fuller Web Site
    Jim Fuller Web Site
    Jim Fuller Web Site
  • Tom Clarke Web Site
    Tom Clarke Web Site
    Tom Clarke Web Site
    Tom Clarke Web Site

ATAC TV™ Firearm Reply and Answer:

This viewer’s question sent to ATAC TV™ Firearms Channel is about the mechanical advantage of a booster on the end of a short barreled rifle, such as a

AKS-74 Krink, or similar firearm.  Jim Fuller and Tom Clarke with ATAC discuss the reliability of the short-barreled rifles, with and without the booster attached.  ATAC guys describe it as an energy accumulator for reliability in short-barreled firearm systems.

Standard length barrels with gas systems have a “dwell” time as the bullet travels down the barrel past the gas port to the point when it exits the muzzle.  During this time, gas is passed into the gas port putting pressure on the piston, which in turn causes the bolt to move to the rear, cycling the action.  The amount of the gas pressure and duration of that pressure in the gas system creates the consistent reliability of the firearm.

Now, shorten the barrel, and the dwell time is much shorter too.  Jim and Tom’s example is a AKS-74U Krink with the gas port about an inch from the end of the barrel as opposed to standard barrels with 4-5 inches of bore past the gas hole. 

Read More on the ATACTV Firearms Blog

The short, compact versions of standard rifles are used in tight quarters such as vehicles or armored style trucks, or other instances where space and maneuverability becomes an issue.  The Krink is roughly half the physical length of a standard AK-47 with its stock folded.  This is a real advantage when a smaller compact rifle package is required.

There are a few after-market muzzle boosters on the market that are designed to give you the back pressure required for function of the shot barreled rifle, but also help eliminate the fireball that is produced from shooting.  Jim and Tom describe the differences between the original booster and a couple of newer style products available with additional advantages of reducing the muzzle flash.  Watch the video linked below for much more detail describing the value of the rifles with boosters.

Watch The Video Reply with Jim Fuller & Tom Clarke Here:  What is a Barrel Booster?

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