ATAC TV Viewer Q&A: Why would you want Mil Dots on a Spotting Scope?

Tom Clarke & Lenny Bolton with ATAC TV Firearms discuss a few reasons for Mil Dots, or some type of reticle in a spotting scope.

ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
  • ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
    ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
    ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
    ATAC TVT Firearms Channel
  • Tom Clarke
    Tom Clarke
    Tom Clarke
    Tom Clarke

ATAC TV Firearm Reply and Answer:

Tom Clarke & Lenny Bolton with ATAC TV Firearms discuss a few reasons for Mil Dots, or some type of reticle in a spotting scope.  The ATAC guys use the Leupold Golden Ring Mark 4 12-40X60mm w/TMR #60040 Spotting Scope, the same ones used by military sniper teams.  This spotting scope has the TMR (Tactical Milling Reticle) that matches the reticle in the Leupold Mark 4 M-2 riflescopes on our custom Venom Tactical sniper rifles.  This eases the workload on the spotter/shooter teams when solving the range calculation to an intended target.  Also, the Leupold TMR is “hash marks” instead of the standard Mil Dots (footballs) that make measuring with the reticle easier in the field.

Mil Dots, sometimes called “footballs” are a measuring reference that allows a shooter to calculate distance to a target of known size.  Without getting into the trigonometric equations and measurements, we will keep this in basic terms. The “Mil” in Mil Dot stands for “milliradian”.  The radian is a unit-less measure, which is equivalent to degrees.  Simply, it tells you have far around a circle you have gone.  This is a basic reference for measuring in conjunction with MOA (Minute of Angle) give the shooter the ability to calculate distance for use with his ballistic table of bullet drop.  Actual use of the Mil Dot and calculations will be discussed in a different video and blog.

Back to the question, the shooter’s scope mounted on the rifle has the Mil Dots and any use of a spotting scope would enhance his abilities to have the same Mil dot reticle in the spotting scope.  If the sniper has a spotter, there is a huge advantage to have the spotter using the same reference (Mil Dot reticle) as the shooter does in his scope.  Allows both the shooter and spotter to see the same reticle.

The spotting scope usually has much higher adjustable power setting than the normal riflescope.  This allows the spotter to locate targets, read wind, estimate range to target, and actually see bullet strikes the shooter cannot.  The advantage of the Mil Dot equipped spotting scope is priceless for a spotter/shooter team.  Watch the linked video for more in-depth information from Tom and Lenny on the ATAC TV Firearms Channel.  Good shooting!

Watch Video Here: Why would you want Mil Dots on a Spotting Scope?

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