Vermont Public Radio Wins Seven Regional Edward R. Murrow Awards

Awards Honor Excellence In Electronic Journalism

Vermont Public Radio has been honored with seven regional Edward R. Murrow Awards from the Radio Television Digital News Association (RTDNA). VPR received awards in the following categories: news series, breaking news coverage, sports, documentary, use of sound, newscast, and writing.

"These awards truly represent a team effort, particularly the coverage of Tropical Storm Irene,” said John Van Hoesen, VPR’s vice president for news and programming. "As a public broadcaster, we are accountable to the community we serve.  We are honored to receive these awards because they go to the heart of VPR’s mission to provide an essential and trusted independent voice for news and information in our region.”

The winning coverage includes:

UVM At  A Crossroads (News Series)

A collection of news pieces in the days following Tropical Storm Irene (Breaking News)

A profile of the pitcher from Stowe who inspired the Bruce Springsteen Hit “Glory Days” (Sports)

The Irene Effect (Documentary)

A primer on how to call an auction (Use Of Sound)

A newscast from the morning after Tropical Storm Irene (Newscast)

A story about the theremin, an obscure musical instrument, and one man’s work to renew appreciation for it
(Writing)

In all, 14 awards were made in the small market radio category for the region, which includes all of the New England states. Vermont Public Radio will be honored at a ceremony this spring and it will now be entered in all of these categories for the national awards.

The RTDNA is the world's largest professional organization exclusively serving the electronic news profession, consisting of more than 3,000 news directors, news associates, educators and students. Founded as a grassroots organization in 1946, the association is dedicated to setting standards for newsgathering and reporting. Although news techniques and technologies are constantly changing, RTDNA's commitment to encouraging excellence in the electronic journalism industry remains the same.