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Snow King donates historic Kelly-Murie Cabin to Fighting Bear Antiques to preserve

Snow King donates historic Kelly-Murie Cabin to Fighting Bear Antiques to preserve

(Jackson, Wyo.) - Today, Fighting Bear Antiques will begin the process to move the Historic Kelly-Murie Cabin from Snow King Mountain to 15 East Kelly Ave. in Jackson. The cabin, which was built in 1925 by George W. Kelly, was the home of prominent naturalists Adolph and Louise Murie from 1939 to 1945, and was sold to Snow King in 1981. The building has housed some legendary Jackson figures including Bill and Mary Ashley, Virginia Huidekoper, and Barry and Muffy Corbett. Many locals remember the building as the law firm of Hank Phibbs - who had been the Muries’ attorney. Phibbs was there from 1975-2010. [image: Inline image 1] *Photo: A plaque from the Teton County Historic Preservation Society affixed to the front of the cabin. h/t Snow King Mountain / Pitchengine Communities* “We’re donating the cabin to the Winchell’s to preserve,” said Ryan Stanley, GM of Snow King Mountain. “We’re excited they’re planning to restore the building right in the heart of Jackson, which will serve as a tribute to the important role the Muries' played in our community’s history.” Terry and Claudia Winchell, owners of Fighting Bear Antiques, intend to restore the cabin for local rental housing. They currently have another cabin, the Sturlin Cabin built in 1937, on the property. “Being in the antique business, it means a lot to us to be able to preserve this historical house,” said Terry Winchell. “We worked against almost impossible odds, and the partnership with Snow King has been great. It’s a win-win for everyone.” The area currently occupied by the cabin will be landscaped and beautified to serve as a recreational area adjacent to a new 18-hole miniature golf course built by Harris Miniature Golf . Preparations to move the cabin begin today, and are scheduled to be completed by the end of the week. *Feature Photo: A Photo of the Kelly-Murie Cabin. Courtesy of the Teton County Historical Preservation Society. © Michael Cassity, 2005.