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First case of Zika diagnosed in Teton County

(Jackson, Wyo.) - According to the Teton County Public Health Officer Dr. Travis Riddell, there has been a Zika virus infection diagnosed in Teton County. "The infection was likely acquired in the Caribbean and the patient is not a permanent resident of Teton County," said Dr. Riddell. He says that the case was in July and it poses no risk to public health. Just yesterday, the Wyoming Department of Health (WDH) issued a new travel warnings as a result of the virus reaching Miami, Florida. “Folks need to stay informed when planning travel both within the United States and to other areas affected by Zika virus, but the mosquitoes that spread the disease do not make their homes in Wyoming,” said Dr. Tracy Murphy, state epidemiologist with WDH. Recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) include: - Pregnant women should not travel to the newly identified area in Florida or other Zika-affected locations. - Sexual partners of pregnant women who live in or who have traveled to an affected area should consistently and correctly use condoms or other barriers against infection during sex or abstain from sex during the pregnancy. - All pregnant women who live in or travel to an area with active Zika virus transmission, or who have sex with a partner who lives in or traveled to an area with active Zika virus transmission without using condoms or other barrier methods to prevent infection should be assessed for possible Zika virus exposure during each prenatal care visit and tested according to CDC guidance. - Women and men who traveled to this area should wait at least 8 weeks before trying for a pregnancy; men with Zikasymptoms should wait at least 6 months. - Anyone with possible exposure to Zika virus and symptoms of Zika should be tested. The most common symptoms of Zika virus disease are fever, rash, joint pain and red eyes. The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week. Read more about the travel warnings here. *Feature Photo: Culex mosquito sucking blood. h/t mrfiza / shutterstock /