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American Sentinel University Nurses Week Daily 10 Profiles Top 10 Responses to Use When a Nurse Co-worker Gets Nasty

– Dr. Renee Thompson of RT Connections Shares Tips for Nurses to Use When Dealing with an Offensive Co-worker for Nurses Week 2016 –

AURORA, Colo. – May 11, 2016 – American Sentinel University’s Nurses Week Daily 10 profiles the top 10 responses ways for nurses to use when a co-worker gets nasty for Nurses Week 2016.

“If you’re like me, you think of the best responses to offensive co-worker behaviors during your morning shower the next day. But by then, it’s too late,” says Dr. Renee Thompson, keynote speaker, author, award-winning nurse blogger, and professional development/anti-bullying thought leader.

Dr. Thompson says the secret to dealing with an offensive co-worker is to prepare ahead of time so that at the moment, you can deliver your response with grace and walk away knowing that you handled the situation professionally and with dignity.

Here’s Dr. Thompson’s list of 10 top responses to use when a co-worker gets nasty:

Great for students or new nurses

1. “I’m not comfortable with _____________ (this assignment, this procedure, this situation, etc.).”

2. “I’m concerned that patient safety will be compromised if _________ (you don’t assist me during this procedure, I am left alone to deal with this crisis, etc.).”

Great for co-workers who have behaved unprofessionally for a long time

3. “I’m not sure you realize this, but sometimes you can come across as being ________ (intimidating, aggressive, unapproachable, etc.).” And then give an example.

4. “The relationship I have with you is important to me (or to our department). I’d like to talk about what happened __________ (yesterday, this morning, etc.).”

Great to redirect focus back to patients

5. “Although we disagree on some things, let’s agree to make decisions based on what’s best for our patients.”

6. “How can we work together for the good of our patients even when we disagree?”

Great in the moment

7. “You are yelling and screaming at me in front of patients and their families.” (overt behavior)


8. “I am willing to discuss this with you as long as you are willing to speak to me in a respectful manner.”

9. “I’m receptive to feedback. However, if you can’t deliver that feedback calmly and respectfully, I’m not willing to listen.”

10. “I find that comment offensive.”

Important consideration

Although you may feel inclined to give the bullies a dose of their own medicine, never, never, NEVER resort to their level. Always choose the high road and respond in a professional manner.

As the late Dr. Martin Luther King said so eloquently, “Hate begets hate; violence begets violence; toughness begets a greater toughness. We must meet the forces of hate with the power of love.”

Together, we can stop the cycle of nurse bullying!

Take care, stay connected and happy nurses week!

-Renee

Read more of American Sentinel University’s Nurses Week Daily 10 at http://www.americansentinel.edu/blog/2016/05/11/dr-renee-thompsons-top-10-responses-when-a-co-worker-gets-nasty/


About Dr. Renee Thompson
Dr. Renee Thompson is a keynote speaker, author, award-winning nurse blogger, and professional development/anti-bullying thought leader. Renee spends the majority of her time helping healthcare and academic organizations address and eliminate workplace bullying. To find out more about Renee, please visit her website. American Sentinel University friends and family can get 25% off Renee’s great anti-bullying products – simply enter the code: AMSENT16.

About American Sentinel University

American Sentinel University delivers accredited online degree programs in nursing (BSN, MSN, and DNP) and healthcare management (MBA Healthcare, M.S. Information Systems Management, and M.S. Business Intelligence and Analytics). Its affordable, flexible bachelor’s and master’s nursing degree programs are accredited by the Commission for the Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), of One Dupont Circle, NW Suite 530, Washington, D.C., 20036. The DNP program is accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) of 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, Ga., 30326. The University is accredited by the Distance Education Accrediting Commission, DEAC, 1101 17th Street NW, Suite 808, Washington, D.C. 20036, (202) 234-5100, www.deac.org

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