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All About Developmental Disabilities “Ambassador Leadership Program” Announces Spring Graduates

Unique program teaches young adults with developmental disabilities to be community leaders

Several young adults from throughout Metro Atlanta recently graduated from All About Developmental Disabilities’ Ambassador Leadership training program. All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) is an Atlanta-based non-profit organization dedicated to providing family support, advocacy and training opportunities for individuals and families living with developmental disabilities. The Ambassador program is a unique 8-week leadership program within AADD designed to teach young adults between the ages of 20 and 30 with developmental disabilities to become active and influential leaders in their communities.

The new graduates are Bryan Nance of Woodstock, Eren Niederhoffer of Dunwoody, Brendan Jagielsk of Alpharetta, Bess Winebarger of Lilburn, Nicole Selph of Griffin, and Philip Modesitt of Buckhead. They were trained by AADD Ambassador instructor Kylie Moore.

The goals of the Ambassador program are to:

  • Help people learn about themselves and their disability
  • Build self-esteem
  • Develop strong communication skills
  • Learn how to increase disability awareness among the general public

In the past, people with developmental disabilities have not been included as equal members of their community or seen as influential leaders. The Ambassador program is working to change that. After graduation, participants may be invited to speak and present at various events around Metro Atlanta.

About All About Developmental Disabilities

Founded in 1956, All About Developmental Disabilities (AADD) is an Atlanta-based non-profit organization dedicated to providing family support, advocacy and training opportunities for individuals and families living with developmental disabilities.  

Developmental disabilities are defined as severe chronic intellectual and/or physical disabilities that limit three or more critical functional abilities. Examples include Down syndrome, cerebral palsy, spina bifida, autism disorders, fetal alcohol disorders and intellectual disabilities. These disabilities manifest early in life (before age 22) and last a lifetime.

Georgia relies on a disjointed system of services and support that cannot be sustained long-term.  Economic uncertainties are reducing funding support, even as the number of people in need increases.  AADD offers a range of services focusing on Family Support, Public Policy and Advocacy and Community Engagement.  For more information, go to www.AADD.org or call us at (404) 881-9777.

Contact: Mitch Leff, mitch@leffassociates.com, (404) 861-4796