Afro-fusion band AfriCali announce new single, THE S.T.R.U.G.G.L.E

Los Angeles, CA -- The California band known as AfriCali have released their latest single. "THE S.T.R.U.G.G.L.E" features a unique blend of soulful rock, blues, heavy rhythms and percussion of 1970s Ethiopian music topped with coastal-psych seasoning. A sound that embodies the meaning of Afro-fusion, AfriCali's "THE S.T.R.U.G.G.L.E," is an all around powerful track that invites you to enjoy the band's version of Afrobeat, and its cultural roots. The new single can be heard on Soundcloud at

Produced and written by Nico Georis and South African MC Eyezon, the concept of "THE S.T.R.U.G.G.L.E," is a bit more in-depth than the production itself. Eyezon's original prose results in funked out bliss that melds political poetry, Marvin Gaye's brand of R&B and the deep rhythmic jams of Galactic. On the song, Georis plays keyboards like a lead guitar and Eyezon uses his voice like a second lead instrument.

The new movement took root in the summer of 2010 at the Nacarubi Festival in Big Sur, California Eyezon Soweto hit the stage, joining Nico Georis on keys, during Sky Country's set. After a late night campfire and jam session with the new friends, Eyezon approached Georis with a new genre of music he thought they had on their hands, "Afri-Cali." Little did they know, after that conversation a musical phenomenon and culture would progress into something unforgettable.

"Afri-Cali," is a term Eyezon came up with due to being a product of Northern California by way of his native South Africa. He describes Afri-Cali as "a mixture of Afrobeat truth consciousness with a California Street Swagger morphed with Hip Hop and drenched in Cultural Roots." Eyezon credits Afrobeat as the central influence on the creation of "Africali" music, but there is a slight difference. "Afri-Cali is lighter than Afrobeat in terms of feel where Afrobeat is heavier, funkier stuff," he told Monterey County Weekly.

Shortly after their joint shows, the band was a sensation and headlined the Hidden Valley Music Center. Now, the talented musicians have garnered the attention from fans everywhere even outlets like Brooklyn Bodega,, and

About AfriCali
Eyezon grew up in South Africa where he says music was the escape from the Apartheid, poverty and struggle going on at that time. Hearing the sounds of Hugh Masekela to Brenda Faso to Earth, Wind and Fire to Michael Jackson, Eyezon started to recognize that music would be his muse. He was introduced to Hip hop in school back in '94 or '95 by artists named Tumi (Tumi and the Volumes), Kao and others. He believes Hip Hop was similar to the slogans in South Africa, which were the songs and chants used when the people would march. His love for both Hip Hop and South African music stirred up his co-creation of AfriCali, which he shares with producer Nico Georis. Today their sound and culture has swept the California area and it is spreading, fast.