keyboard_arrow_up

5 common questions about the plague answered

5 common questions about the plague answered

(Cody, Wyo.) - This morning, it was confirmed that a cat died and tested positive for plague yesterday at Advanced Vet Care in Cody. Read our initial report here . Bill Crampton, Nurse Manager for Park County Public Health confirmed that this particular case occurred near the first housing subdivision off of Southfork Road in Cody. "This is not an unusual occurrence," Crampton explained. "There is plague in the soil all around Wyoming, so it's nothing surprising for us." We asked Crampton to address a few of the questions we've been getting from readers: *1. How can folks help prevent their pets from getting the plague? * "Flea collars and flea treatments are highly recommended and are the best preventative measures against the disease." *2. What are the symptoms of plague in animals? * "In cats specifically, symptoms include inflammation, vomiting, not eating, swelling in the head and neck area, fevers. However, symptoms will vary depending on how far along they are after exposure." *3. Since people can get the plague, what are some preventative measures people can take? * "If you see a dead animal, don't use your bare hands to dispose of it. If you come across a large number of dead animals, call him at 307-527-8570." *4. What are the symptoms of plague in animals? * "In cats specifically, symptoms include inflammation, vomiting, not eating, swelling in the head and neck area, fevers. However, symptoms will vary depending on how far along they are after exposure." *5. What are the symptoms in humans?* "The most common symptoms in humans include fever, headaches, chills and weakness." He added, "People who are sick or have open wounds should take extra precautions." Read more through the CDC here. *6. What's the treatment for humans? * "If diagnosed early the plague is easily treated with antibiotics." Local Veterinarian, Erin Peterson explained plague as a "bacterial infection" and reminded folks that "Fleas can transmit this infection from rodents to another animal or person. Animals can also get it directly from another infected animal." Crampton reassured the public that this is nothing to be terribly concerned about. "This is all really common sense stuff." Any additional questions can be directed to Crampton at 307-527-8570. *Feature photo: h/t Luke Hayfield